Schoolzone | Non-teaching staff reflections on the first month of lockdown

Non-teaching staff reflections on the first month of lockdown

Date: 01.06.2020

Non-teaching staff

Here's what non-teacher respondents told us, via our May survey of over 3,500 education professionals:

  • A sense of lowered motivation and restricted movement has affected my mood (Research and Teaching)
  • Actually quite enjoying it! (PPA Cover)       
  • affected physically - hunched over a laptop rather than working at a well-designed work station. Missing banter with colleagues and the chats with them that make you realise you are not the only one who thinks - for example - that the last email sent out should be ignored.
  • All feelings have come in spikes. Whenever I had a lecture to deliver, I got immersed enough to feel effective and worthwhile. But dealing with normal work stuff, and family demands has taken its toll. By the end of every day I feel defeated and exhausted. I am starting look forward to bed time although it's still noon! I wake up in the morning and my hope for a good day is not as high as it used to be. I feel saddened as I write this - being a parent is something I love. But work demands are making it difficult. (lecturing)          
  • Am currently doing the NASENCo course which has occupied most of my time and would have been more pressured under normal circumstances. The change with the opening of schools and a son who is shielded has altered the situation negatively even though I am not being pressured to return. (Senco )
  • Angry and lonely and frustrated (TA)
  • Anxiety around English Government mishandling and misleading public (Learning Support)         
  • Anxiety over work/stress initially relieved but has begun to return in view of long term effects on work and society. realised that my job is important but needs to be face to face (pastoral position)
  • Anxious (Technician)
  • Anxious about the uncertainties in so many areas of life for me and my family. Hopelessness and some anger at the Government response to the pandemic, their refusal to accept that mistakes were made in their response, and no confidence in their ability to deal with things moving forward. Anxiety at the thought of more children returning to school when there is conflicting evidence as to whether or not it is safe. Nature, literature, and trying to be content with what I have are sanity savers. (HLTA (but qualified teacher))   
  • Anxious about what is coming next! (HR)      
  • Anxious, depressed, worried (Art Technician)
  • Anxious, nervous, untrusting, physically sick at times, lonely despite having family around, frustrated as job so unlike our norm though goods to undertake projects which time doesn’t allow normally (Active Schools)
  • Paranoid as most response with work is via email with no context. Unmotivated. Frustrated easily. (Office Staff)     
  • Apart from the added pressure of working and home schooling I feel happy and sane. I am just not stressing about it. (Technical instructor)    
  • apprehensive (administration)              
  • As a social recluse lockdown has not changed my life in anyway. Working from home is working well due to having the technology needed to work seamlessly and I can meet people online just as easily (if not more easily) as before. Any stress I experienced is due to others projecting their stress onto me. (Learning Technologist)    
  • As Chair of governors I am one step removed. From contact with my headteacher up until the announcement last week, he would have described everything in positive terms. During conversations this week he is in a state of turmoil with mixed emotions about safety for both staff and children and the complexities of operational management to minimise risk his primary concerns. He is angry children are an experimental group for political purposes not on expert medical advice and negative press. Will answer Q on my perception of workload. concern. (Chair of governors)       
  • as in a team it difficult to always work on my own (Technician)      
  • As someone who had pre-existing mental health conditions, lockdown has really affected me in a negative way. My mental health conditions which were under control from therapy and medication have gotten a lot worse and I feel like I've regressed massively. (Learning progress assistant)      
  • At times flat and disconnected but mostly alright and counting my blessings. My work is still very busy though in a different way, which provides me with a new challenge and helps me feel useful. (HR Advisor)      
  • Better thank in actual work. Working from home suits me, even if the workload is silly. Still, I'm more relaxed without having to commute and I don't miss human interaction. (Admin)
  • Blessed to spend the extra time with my own child.
  • Bored at times - miss campus life and my office. My bicycle commute was a great source of daily exercise and equilibrium setting between work and home the reason for which no longer exists so I have to find excuses to get out on my bike or walk instead to maintain my physical and (to a lesser extent) mental health. (Professional services)  
  • Busy, frustrated, but feel good that I have got to grips with some newer aspects of ICT that I have had to use and appreciate more my home, garden and family company.
  • Concerns of others can affect me however I am generally positive in attitude. (Community Engagement Manager )          
  • Confused and scared (Teaching Assistant )      
  • confused and unhappy with news about schools and return to work or not (Classroom assistant)    
  • Confused and worried (Behaviour support assistant )   
  • confused as Government give mixed messages, concerned that schools are being asked to open fully before July , how will this work (Family Support Safeguarding Lead)        
  • Depending on days, weather and deadlines (Inclusion assistant )      
  • Depressed and isolated (Office Staff)
  • depressed, no control of life (administrator)
  • Detached from society and normal routine and loosing track of time (Teaching Assistant)       
  • Difficult to stay connected to your colleagues sometimes (Research Fellow and Teaching Assistant)               
  • Disconnected Uninspired (Professional services ) 
  • Disconnected with the wider world outside my front door (admin)
  • Dreading my return. Thinking of emigrating. Sick of this incompetent government and its allies in the press. (Academic Mentor EAL)
  • During this time there has been the odd day where things have felt lonely and disconnected which has caused me to have at times during that day uncontrollable crying periods. (Admin)              
  • Emotional rollercoaster (PHD)
  • Enjoyed working when it suits me rather than fitting in with a rigid school timetable (HLTA) 
  • Even little decisions seem to take forever - like whether to go food shopping. I delay and delay until I really have to go. I think it's because I'm really on edge because you sense all this unease. I know everyone is nervous and unsure but I don't think many people are managing it well. Instead of defaulting to being kind and understanding, I sense this power imbalance in over-officiousness and constant disapproval. So I just feel enormous relief and gratitude when someone in a shop is polite or helpful. Once in a small village post office, I had such a miserable encounter I burst into tears, it wiped me for out the rest of the day. I know we tend to focus on the bad, and I have had some very positive experiences out and about but I'm sure it's this enormous shift in social dynamics which has unsettled me...Even though I'm a cheerful soul, and have so much to be grateful for, I've also felt incredibly lonely at times, more than ever before. I have tons of friends and close family, we're always in touch but in the quieter weekend moments, I often get hit by a wave of grief that I'm alone. Going out by myself for a walk or cycle ride has become really hard because it reinforces I'm alone. I think it's really helpful to be honest with myself about this but it's also pretty bleak because I don't see how it's going to change in the near future...I can't wait to get a dog! (Research Assistant)
  • Exhausted, unappreciated and drained (Teaching and Research )             
  • I am working more now than I am when school is fully open. (Parent Support Advisor )
  • Extremely busy
  • Feel totally frustrated at why people can’t sit at home so life can go back to normal as soon as possible. It’s annoying to see people walking around all the time and shops like takeaways open for business (HLTA )
  • Feel very disjointed and l do not feel connected to my colleagues
  • Felt more relaxed working at home, but nice to go into work and see people. (TA / Wraparound care)
  • Forgotten about , excluded from the team (Trainer)             
  • Frightened ,with the death toll rising .Worried about my family and friends. Not bothered about queues for shopping if it keeps us safe. Worried that migrants may bring infection into the uk.
  • Frustrated (Year Manager)
  • Frustrated at lack of clarity of what is expected of me from the government, local authority and school leadership (Pastoral Manager/Safeguarding)            
  • Frustrated for the students and unable to change it for them (Careers leader)
  • Frustrated, lonely
  • Angry. Crazy with the children. Alone. Sad. (Midway assistant )        
  • Frustration that I haven't achieved nearly as much as I expected by staying at home (Professor with research duties)              
  • Guilt - doing both home schooling and my job well is often difficult with both competing with my time Lucky that I have a job and all my family is healthy Optimistic that will come out of this to a changed but maybe better, fairer, kinder world
  • Guilty and frustrated because I cannot do my job properly. I should be holding one-to-one careers interviews with students and taking them out to visit universities and workplaces. There is only a limited amount I can do at home. After working for 37 years, 36 of which were as a full time teacher, doing little work doesn’t come easily. . (Careers leader)
  • Happy to be away from micromanaging heads of department (Peripatetic teacher)     
  • Have been very up and down, good days and bad, good weeks and bad weeks, have felt very motivated at times followed by a total lack of motivation for a few days! (Marketing officer (professional services))               
  • High bills working from home with no support financially from workplace. No additional child support despite having children home full time! Hard supporting everyone else when not feeling supported myself. (Family worker)
  • Highs and lows..love my school..doing their best..thanks for asking (Clerk) 
  • hopeful that it will not last too long (tutor) 
  • Hugely distracted in many ways leading to a loss of focus, concentration and attention - due to e.g., securing food and supplies, old parent (and neighbour) capacity to cope- literally losing her mind in her isolation, immediate family security, home schooling/ health of teenage children, ideas about the future, blocks on current research plans, loss of liberty, plans for the summer lost. There has also been a discernible anger directed at the government due to their apparent inability to set and follow a practical strategy, to tell the truth, their regular exhortations not to criticise at this time and the ideological nature of their communications. . (PhD Researcher)            
  • I am actually enjoying a slower pace of life since the lockdown. I find it easier to switch off from work and not to get pulled into the stresses of everyday politics in the workplace. I can focus on one thing at a time. (Teaching and Research/Lecturer)           
  • I am dissapointed that I have been forced to use my safehaven as a workplace and that my children are subjected to this also. (Profossional)   
  • i am feeling more down and depressed and more out of control (tutor) 
  • I am fortunate that I have lots to keep me occupied. I have a garden and greenhouse and lots of crafts including making 78 face masks. Also happy to spend time in the kitchen cooking and doing other household chores. I do not have the pressure of having school age children at home and appreciate that if I had I may well be feeling a lot different.
  • I am going into work about 1 x a week and in a support role it is very difficult to support students who don't want to do anything without sitting close to them or using their keyboard. I feel uncomfortable about how close even teenagers get to me and each other. It is tiring having to constantly remind them about social distancing and I am concerned about safety if the school reopens for whole year groups. (HLTA) 
  • I am not looking forward to gong back to work. I have less stress and realise now how much I hate my job. I have actively been looking for other work. (Library staff)    
  • I am semi-retired which colours my responses
  • I feel calmer and more in control in the last month. However, fears about going out again with the virus still there are hovering. (Adviser)            
  • I feel fairly lost and disjointed from my work. I feel safe at home but not when I go out (Associate staff)
  • I feel like I have worked more since I have been at home as found it difficult to switch off. (Pastoral Support)             
  • I feel more tired since being in lock down and I know I’m going to struggle to return to work (One to one)               
  • I feel my role is much more important now, but restrictions by local government have made it difficult to get going in a new way, ie virtually which has been frustrating for me and the families wanting support. (Outreach )        
  • I felt ok living alone with just a few lows but when it was announced school was opening I my anxiety has rocketed. (Pastoral Mentor)           
  • I have accept I can not change the situation so rather than feeling frustrated due to the restrictions I am making the best of them. More time to spend (even if its virtually) with friends and family. Prioritising what is really important. (Administration)              
  • I have been more productive in school (support and DT technician)       
  • I have been somewhat distracted by the birth of my second child 3 weeks ago. (marketing)       
  • I have feel more stressed and under pressure working from home than I ever feel being in the work place, I feel isolated from colleagues and communication is not that great (EAL HLTA)         
  • I have felt a great sense of confusion in regards to the guidelines in relationship to special educational needs school's and how they have been considered alongside mainstream. I believe that we should of had separating to help with understanding of how we were to operate with every child having a EHCP, a majority having social workers without concerns but rather for support, social distancing with pupils who have the developmental age of a 0-6 months year old and therefore requires close contact to ensure they receive appropriate development., eg through intensive interaction. (Pastoral Staff) 
  • I have felt isolated at times with no real contact with anyone in particular my line manager.
  • I have felt that is hard to engage across different department or start project work, but I have felt that within my team we have all made a real effort to keep in contact (Student support)           
  • I have felt unsupported by my department , line manager and school. I have made many attempts to be actively involved but my school do not appear interested or care for my wellbeing or value me as a member of staff. (support staff pastoral )
  • I have found a good balance between the work I have to do for work and making time for projects on the homefront. I live alone but I am quite comfortable with my own company.
  • I have found technology adds to my stress - needing to learn new ways to communicate through technology and trying to support students and their families with technology on top of everything else. (Part time (3 days) Learning Support Mentor SEN)      
  • I have had days when I’ve felt really low and just cried. I have felt more stressed at working online than I am doing the work I would normally do in the classroom. I was not meant to be sat in front of a computer screen. (Teaching assistant )      
  • I have had down days where I felt sad , angry and frustrated. mainly due to not being able to visit family and loved ones who I usually see regularly. (Pastoral year leader and DSL)   
  • I have loved and valued the extra time spent with my one year old but it has been exhausting trying to work as well. I am also very much missing family (Professional Services)
  • I have shut myself and my children away from 'the news' and we have all taken a journey of self improvement and connecting with each other. (Specialist TA)   
  • I never experienced so much anxiety like I do these days (Lecturer (teaching and research))
  • I think it helps having a lot creative interests and outlets.
  • I think the workload for me as a Head Teacher has increased massively. The timings of announcements and the lack of clear guidance has added significantly to my stress. The lack of clarity has then impacted on my staff stress levels and sell being due to the every changing landscape. The teaching profession has been badly represented in the press and by many in the Government eg Gove, Adonis. Ofsted has also impacted massively on staff wellbeing and has shown itself to be out of touch and punitive. (Head) 
  • I’ve not been in work much due to rota, when in I feel like ‘what is the point of being here’ I dread my next day in. The pupils who are in school are not learning and can’t be bothered! As well, I receive an email bulletin once a week, this is aimed more for teachers. None of the SLT have contacted me for chat or a quick hello, except for one text the first day after Easter holidays. (Teaching Assistance)    
  • II feel frustrated at the rules set for lock down but I also understand that it is keeping me safe as I have asthma and a lung condition. My school is in touch everyday and I know who to contact should I feel vulnerable or upset. My school is paying for a counselling service that is available to school staff and their families and also for students and their families. (Cover Supervisor and Teacher)
  • isolated and unsupported (Business Analyst)          
  • isolated from senior leadership team (SENCo)
  • Isolated, unsupported by my school. I don't have any contact except occasional email/ team staffroom chat but those I have to initiate there is no central support o regular meeting. I have had one email from my line manager saying I am doing a great job but they've nerv actually asked what I am doing. (Librarian)          
  • It feels like my life has been placed on hold. I have kept busy with the time I have had, and continued to work, but I fill less productive and a little bit lonely.
  • It has been a struggle not getting up every day to my usual routine. The not knowing is also difficult - with all this in mind I agree and understand that staying home and safe is paramount. (After school club provider)               
  • It has been hard mentally more than physicaly (Cover supervisor )         
  • It has been hard to adjust to home working as a large part of my job is interaction with students. I miss this
  • It has been hard to not see the students face to face to gauge how they are doing, and be able to help. (Sixth Form Pastoral lead)        
  • It has been the strangest time of all our lives. Adjustment has been difficult but I believe that I have also learned about the things that are important and I have had time to reconsider my priorities. I hope that worldwide, people will have learned that we all need to look after each other and our planet. I have hope. (Admin. Support)            
  • It has exacerbated a pre-existing lack of effective line management. (Administrator)
  • it is hard to have no contact with family. I am separated and my children live away. (head of boarding)               
  • It was tough for the first 2-3 weeks learning to work online google classroom and getting familiar with this new way of working so it was stressful, whilst managing home life and having all the family members at home. (Support Teacher)          
  • It's been great. Sense of wellbeing and general mental health have improved so much. (Admin)              
  • It's now monthS. I feel increasingly concerned about the lack of certainty regarding my role, how temporary changes might be used to sneak in permanent changes such as three teaching terms and the impact this has on my research and career progression (Senior Lecturer (teaching and research))             
  • I've felt better since lockdown with work life balance. I have felt more relaxed and been able to do things at my own pace causing stress levels to decrease and overall wellbeing to be better. (IAG)    
  • I've felt despair about other people not taking any notice of the lockdown at all, including family. The lockdown doesn't affect me too much but its effects do and will do. At the moment I can't see a positive future for our sector at all. The students I've spoken to are mainly 'getting on with it' the best they can and some are very anxious and uncertain. I seem to be able to help quite a few, which is a big positive. (Career Counsellor)        
  • I've missed being at school. Looking forward to seeing colleagues and the students. I have asthma so have not been allowed on the school premises since lockdown. (Office Administrator)   
  • Just a feeling of not knowing the way forward or when that will be (librarian)           
  • Just as busy which is really helpful. Difficult juggling being busy at work and dealing with a vulnerable adult who we believe has had a mild form of the virus. Trying to cope with a very busy workload, shopping, housework, caring, etc has been challenging
  • Keen to be with people more doing group activities (Director of Education) 
  • lack of drive. (Software )        
  • Lack of motivation, skyped out, bombarded with emails & yammer group info (Careers adviser)             
  • lacked concentration, felt others were making demands on me (pastoral)           
  • Less energy, but closer relationship with family is a major positive. It is harder, though, to consider work important or valuable (Chair of Board of Governors )   
  • Less stressed as I do not have to commute to work (total of 3 hours of train travel a day). Find a lot more engaged in my work as my workstation in the office was an open plan which was not comfortable and very distracting (felt like a number). I have noticed better concentration and more flexibility with the way I can now work. I have more time to spend on myself and my exercise and eating schedule has improved. (Senior Administrator) 
  • Let's end the Lock-down - asap! (Governor)
  • life feels more volatile
  • Like everyone there are good days and bad days. Some days I feel completely lost with the situation and the latest round of 'teacher bashing' in the media has made me alternatively very angry or feel like everything I am doing at the moment is pointless
  • Lockdown has increased my mental health struggles resulting in medication being doubled. It has isolated me from the strong support network I did have - technology is great but it doesn’t have the same effect. (Catering support )         
  • Lonely (Cover Supervisor )         
  • Looking forward to normality
  • Lost all my students (Private turor)  
  • Management have showed more bullying behaviour to myself and colleagues. (Admin)              
  • Miss my work life balance. Feel as though alot of the work I've produced is fluff work. Common sense prevails with educated people. (Admin)              
  • Missing seeing my 83 Yr old dad who doesn't live nearby unsettled (Attendance )   
  • Mood swings and changes of how I feel from day to day. (Tutor) 
  • More relaxed and at ease without the pressure to do all the added extras which are placed on me when in the school building. Can complete workload using my own schedule without multitasking as much (Counsellor/Pastora)     
  • More relaxed; sleeping better so more energy. Relieved that I don't have the daily commute and the constant struggle to concentrate in an open plan office (Admin Manager)           
  • My main problem has been motivation. i have an excellent team that I have remained connected to through Teams which has helped enormously (Administration)              
  • My work/life balance is better. I'm much less stressed away from the workplace and the constant physical pressures. I'm busier than ever but it feels like it's more on my terms. Without the commute, I have time to exercise before work so am feeling better physically. Time spent talking to family feels more like quality time rather then worrying about the next thing. (Support Manager)        
  • No contact felt the remote work set was not enough contrary the students felt overwhelmed (Teaching assistant )           
  • No time to feel (Module leader, mid-level academic)     
  • Not so much anxious about what I currently do but about future role and young peoples charges in future - however I’m hopeful (Careers)            
  • Occasional low mood and not optimistic that there will be an end to this. (Enabling Services Coordinator)     
  • Occasionally elated, other times despairing. (Student Support)          
  • Odd - but not really different as I am older and always have little aches pains and gripes! (REtired middle manager now part time lecturer)
  • OK thanks (DPhil student)
  • on pause (PhD student)   
  • Overwhelmed and under supported by school. (Careers Leader)             
  • Overwhelmed trying to look competent with the new online teaching approach and overcoming the technical difficulties by myself. Also anxious about the job security in the future and safety issues when so many people may not have jobs to go to. Fed up with a government that does not inspire confidence. We feel like we’ re all out at sea without a rudder. Anxious about my school leaver daughter’s future ,her mental health and prospects for the future in a failed economy. (Visiting Music Instructor )          
  • Patronised by work boss and given futile and pointless tasks just because we have to prove we are doing something in order to be paid. Not allowed to show initiative and do something interesting and worthwhile. Making me feel useless and pointless (Teaching Assistant)       
  • Quite up and down but trying to see the positives and what solutions we can put in place (Active schools)              
  • really enjoyed not having to commute. Find interactions with students easy using phone/teams/zoom. I think things should change in terms of possibly having expectations of weekly no campus days (save Uni running costs) and a drive to more eco friendly remote working where equivalent experience for students can be given (Professor)        
  • Reformatting (provider )          
  • Sad and very anxious about my family
  • Scared (Attendance/pastoral)  
  • Scared unsure of the future not sure government is leading the correct way?
  • Significantly more stressed with work than I usually am (Administration)
  • Some days are better than others. I feel exhausted, short-tempered than normal, emotional and unable to cope. Family being at home as well is taking its toll. I feel trapped and have nowhere to have 'me' time. I feel no-one understands fully. I feel there is no-one to talk to. I feel disconnected. I desperately want/need my son to go back to secondary school. I work in HE and have a full workload and constantly feel unable to cope.
  • Some of the negatives during lockdown derive not only from lockdown....other life goes on, including, for example, the negative impacts of Brexit on EU27 citizens and their families in the UK (Research Professor)               
  • some technologies have not been available that have hampered my role
  • Some worries about ow my institution is dealing with it, especially extra burdens placed upon myself and other staff, and potential loss of valuable colleagues with nn0renewal of contracts (Senior Lecturer -- resesrch, teaching, admin)          
  • Staff have bonded,Safeguarding in schools has become recognised as being important
  • Trying to maintain a grip on my own work and balance the needs of my childrens' homelearning. Pressure from work has been maintained. No let up in 'projects'. (Lead practitioner)          
  • Suddenly expected to master a host of new skills, especially regarding online teaching and training. (Convenor and lecturer, and careers liaison officer)         
  • Suffered two bereavements during lockdown so not great (Technical Instructor)    
  • Support is minimal, workload is trebled, feeling exhausted and emotional (Head of Year)  
  • Swamped, overwhelmed, having to work differently (Data Manager)
  • Teaching online is very draining. i am a peripatetic teacher and only about 25% of my students signed up online so money is tight. Finding creative ways to teach via a screen takes a lot of time but I am happy to be at home.
  • Teaching singing online is disheartening and discouraging. Sadly none of the enjoyment, spontaneity and beautiful music which happens all the time in real life. (Visiting music teacher)
  • Tend to have a real down feeling on Mondays when after the weekend it's like 'oh, back to sitting behind my computer at home checking in with students and parents'. The week gets better. (Pastoral staff) 
  • Thankful! (Marketing + Comms)   
  • The difference between those employed by the public sector and those in the private sector is difficult to feel anything other than discomfort over. (Governor)        
  • The first few days were tough, but once I talked myself into accepting that this was the new normal it was much better. I work for a medical school and there was a lot of pressure to get everything sorted online, as all face to face teaching cancelled. On the other hand having that work routine has really helped. (Manager at a medical school)
  • The load of the lock down work has landed on the women's plate. Home schooling, house chores and so forth. Work has become more demanding with online this and that taking more time. And other people thinking since you are not at work you won't be working and available all day long. Many triggers for anxiety and depresseion. (associate professor)     
  • The main problem has been 8 hours a day, 6 hours a week of building work across the road for me which has not ceased for the lockdown. It is so loud that I cannot block it out with earplugs or noise cancelling headphones, my desk is constantly vibrating, I cannot concentrate on my work, I have a constant headache and anxiety. it has been torture and is completely unviable to work in these conditions. I wasn't able to leave due to the lockdown and have nowhere else to go. It is lucky that I don't have to teach, because the students would not be able to hear my voice over the noise. There has been no support or advice on what to do in these circumstances from either the builders, developers or local council; nor from my employers. If I had somewhere else to stay I would have. It has affected my mental health and ability to work severely. The noise is so all encompassing that I have daily panic attacks. My cat is also in constant severe distress due to the noise. (researcher)      
  • The political situation is the biggest 'dampener' on my mood: I feel that we are led by people who are incompetent for the roles they occupy and that is somewhat depressing though I am encouraged by many people around me who are striving to make things better. (Support staff and occasional lecturer)  
  • there are days where it is hard to motivate yourself to do work, just because you are not seeing the students directly. It's a very different way of working and it's taken time to adapt and get used to not seeing colleagues and students. I miss them! (Careers Adviser)            
  • There is a distinct lack of satisfaction/self-accomplishment that is vastly apparent as a result of lockdown, with workloads somewhat ever increasing. The satisfaction, fulfilment and appreciation of delivering content, a service or anything else is lost by working virtually, as there is no 'physical' audience delivered to... its like singing on a stage with a blindfold and ear muffs on and not knowing how empty or full the venue is. Whilst I feel my productivity is immeasurably better, I feel a lack of accomplishment even though I am achieving far more than I would as if I were at work. (Support Staff/Clinical) 
  • There is nothing we can do about the situation except keep as cheerful as possible, obey all guidance, have some common sense, and get on with it! (Librarian)          
  • These are difficult times and I guess the key is to work together and take each day as it cones (University International office- student recruitment )           
  • Tired (Admin)              
  • Tired, lost, frightened, anxious, lethargic, overwhelmed, pressured, supported, noticed, ignored, happy, sad, overthinking, ignoring. (Enterprise Educator and adviser / lecturer)        
  • To start I felt very stressed with all the online training, zoom meetings etc as I’m a bit of a dinosaur (60) and this isn’t really my bag. I like the involvement with the children on a day to day basis and online training etc as and when needed not bombarded with it. This caused many sleepless nights, constantly thinking about what I need to do. I know it didn’t all need doing at once but it played on my mind. This has improved as times gone by and I’ve picked up things along the way I probably would never have learnt. I also found I wasn’t switching off on non working days as e mails were still coming in and meetings still happening, I work 3 days officially . (Early Years Teaching Assistant)
  • total despair with Wifi & Programmes tiredness (Senior Teaching Fellow)
  • Totally annoyed about the draconian restrictions that have little or no effect, especially as we now know clearly that COVID 19 is a similar strain as Influenza. I feel really frustrated about the fear mongering that is around every one. (Study Skills Manager)  
  • Uncertain, highly anxious about the future, worried about job security, frightened of poor decisions made on flimsy evidence.
  • uncertain, unsettled I teach practical skills and making, being stuck in front of a computer 7hrs a day is unpleasant (Teaching Technician )   
  • Unclear what the above questions refer to e.g. maybe more close and connected to children/ family, but less close and connected to extended family/ friends/ colleagues (Lecturer)           
  • It's a struggle to work from home, and home school. Poor information from the Government hasn't helped, if they don't know, admit it, move on. Lack of acknowledgment that schools haven't stopped and are now expected to reopen on a whim. (SEND/Pastoral)
  • Unsure some days, nice to be able to get things done at home but concerned about my 2 sons as live away so constant contact which I would not do every day. (Art Technician/TA)        
  • up and down with emotions (support)            
  • upset by media reports of death and those dying not having loved ones with them, worried about myself and husband as we are in the vulnerable group, worried about the future of education and grandchildren (Senior teaching assistant)          
  • Very busy learning new technology and more tired than usual (Learning support peri) 
  • Very concerned about the imminent return to school and being in charge of a “bubble “ of 15 Y6s (HLTA) 
  • Very disorientated as I adjusted to working at home with limited resources. Very isolated from colleagues, it was gratifying to be able to spend better time with family although I missed my son who was unable to return home even for a visit. I do not think I worked so hard in my entire academic career than what i went through since lockdown due to having to quickly shift gear and change all teaching, assessment and student support to online means. This meant having 15-16 hour days with no boundaries in personal time and definitely no work life balance during the first 6 weeks particularly. Handling student fears of clinical placement was also very stressful as HEI's made the decisions to remove students from placement too late. (course leader)
  • very stressed, not effective, isolated and tired. (lecturer)            
  • very up and down which is not me, I am usually very optimistic and fairly cheerful. I can be close to tears for no real reason. Main issues are: change of identity - loss of roles such as grand parenting working from home is fine for the practical aspects but a lot of my work I feel is being around for students and that is more difficult remotely my current job is a post retirement job, part time, so its the social contact aspects, being in a city centre location with access to theatres, restaurants, that I enjoy as well as the work, rather than as a career now major frustration also trying to support my 91yr old mother nearby who is quite a negative person and my usual tactics of taking her out and about cant be done feeling blessed at having lots of friends around the country and able to share feelings with them, have zoom catch ups etc fairly negative about when its all going to end and can see family properly again (Research programme Co-ordinator)      
  • We're still in lockdown!
  • What can you do? (Supply teacher)              
  • When I spend time with the family in my home I really enjoy that time and forget about everything. When working I get tired very quickly and I've had a lot of headaches and neck/ back tnsion (Family support teacher)              
  • wobbly (teaching assistant)
  • Work is 24/7 and prevails over family life. Between school work and food shopping there is little time for anything else. (Administrator)
  • Working remotely from home is different, but not that different from working in my office. I am missing some resources, textbooks and notes, in particular. (Academic staff - teaching and research)              
  • WORRIED ABOUT CARE FOR MY SPECIAL NEEDS DAUGHTER AND MY OTHER CHILDREN ALL COOPED UP TOGETHER (LSA)    
  • Worried about the effect on people and the economy
  • Worried about what is going to happen next when lockdown is released. Felt anxious on hearing more traffic around on the roads. Witnessed people in shops taking precaution and wearing gloves and masks and then just dropping the gloves on the floor when they have got back into their car leaving them for someone else to pick up and dispose of - why are they bothering to take precautions when they obviously don’t care about other individuals catching something from their selfishness/neglect and ignorance (Support)           
  • Worried for my daughter's mental health with the schools shut til September (Researcher with limited teaching)            
  • Worried, anxious, unsettled, fearful, confused, lethargic
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