2018 KS2 results summary

Date: 17.09.2018

In the third year since the new standardised tests were introduced in 2016, the proportion of pupils reaching the government’s expected standard continued to improve, with this year’s cohort of 600,000 pupils the first to have been taught the full revised national curriculum. In 2018, 64% of pupils reached the expected standard in all of reading, writing and maths, while 10% of pupils reached the higher standard.

However, attainment in all of reading, writing and maths is not directly comparable to previous years because of changes to writing teacher assessment (TA) frameworks. In 2017, 61% of pupils reached the expected standard compared to 53% in 2016. In 2017, 9% reached a higher standard in reading, writing and maths compared to 5% in 2016.

Attainment increased slightly in each of the test subjects, reading, maths and GPS compared to 2017.

  • In reading, 75% of pupils reached the expected standard in 2018, up by 4 percentage points from 2017.
  • In maths, 76% of pupils reached the expected standard, up by 1 percentage point.
  • In grammar, punctuation and spelling (GPS), 78% of pupils reached the expected standard, up by 1 percentage point.

 

Regional variance

Schools in inner and outer London received the highest scores overall, including 73% of pupils in Newham reaching the standards and 71% in Tower Hamlets, two of the most deprived local authorities in England. Outside London, 75% of pupils in Trafford schools reached the national standards, as did 71% of pupils in Redcar and Cleveland and 70% in Gateshead.

The statistics showed that 10% of pupils reached the higher standard in reading, writing and maths, compared with just 5% three years previously.

 

Gender variance

Girls remained the strongest performers across all subjects. In reading, 32% of girls achieved marks that showed them to be working at a higher level than the national standard, compared with 25% of boys.

In maths, girls were a single percentage point ahead of boys in reaching the national standard, and more boys were marked as performing at a higher level, the single category where they outperformed girls.

Local authority-maintained schools did slightly better than those with academy status, although there remained a clear divide between those schools that voluntarily converted to academy status and those that were taken into sponsorship.

 

DfE data and reports here